creativewriting

This tag is associated with 3 posts

Found a New Author – Patrick Rothfuss

Cover of "The Name of the Wind (Kingkille...

Cover via Amazon

Readers,

I’m always on the lookout for new authors with interesting backgrounds.  Today I found the website of Patrick Rothfuss, author of  The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Day 1)
His website has a self-written bio plus a blog and interview, all of which are fairly humorous reads.

I honestly spent over half an hour reading every page, comment, and blog entry on his website.  Although I haven’t read his book, yet, I found that I really like his style.  Not only does Patrick’s photo remind me of Zach Galifianakis of The Hangover fame, but his bio makes him seem like a guy that everyone has known at one point or another – that directionless college partier, with the tossled hair and rumpled shirt that he may have had on for a few days straight.  A career student in his early days, he spent nine years before he was forced to graduate by his University.

Unfortunately his book tour doesn’t bring him very close to home but either way I’ll be reading his work in the near future.  I’ve added his website to my blog roll but you can also access it by clicking Here.

Cheers!

~ The Hatter

Commonplace Books – Interesting Idea – Thanks Thomas Jefferson

Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peal...

Image via Wikipedia

Readers,

Today, while I was researching the life of Thomas Jefferson with a particular focus on his poetic appreciation I came across notes on his Literary Commonplace Book.  Wow… how did I not know about this phenomenon?

Apparently, sometime during the Renaissance it became popular to collect favorite verses, thoughts, prayers, or even recipes in what amounted to be a scrapbook.  Eventually, the well-educated were urged to do so during their college years.  Thomas Jefferson began his at age fifteen and continued adding to it until age thirty.  Other famous authors such as Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Mark Twain kept various types of commonplace books.  They could range from basically a journal of scribbled notes and ideas, like Twain’s, to a more familiar scrapbook of pasted newspaper articles, like Thomas Jefferson’s.

I’ve never been one to make use of a journal, even though I do think they are a great creative writing resource, but I can honestly say that seeing how the commonplace books were used throughout history has really inspired me.  I’d love to hear if others are using commonplace books and how you got started.

Also, if you’re interested you can read my full article, Thomas Jefferson – President and Poet, by clicking Here.

The Hatter

People Watching – A Creative Writing Project

Readers,

It’s amazing how much a broken ankle is a perspective changing event.  Suddenly, I can’t go outside by myself for fear of slipping on the ice.  All the small things are now so much more time-consuming and difficult.  I now understand why elderly people will fight tooth and nail to keep their right to drive.  Mobility means so much in this world. 

Since I have so much free time and the lack of mobility to do much with it, today I’m going to bring back a past-time from my creative-writing days.  People-watching.  Not in the sense of making fun of people but in a more constructive way.

Here’s the process. Go to a comfortable place with a fair amount of public present – i.e. a coffee shop, mall, etc.  You’ll need a notepad and a pen or a laptop. Coffee shops are generally my favorite because the clientele tend to stay longer than what you might get in other public places.  Find somewhere comfortable to sit and then just look around. 

Take in your surroundings. Make notes on the background sounds, smells, overall atmosphere. Then take a look at some of the people around you. Find someone who catches you as interesting.  This will be your character. They could be very similar to you or you could be complete opposites.  You’ll find that the type of person you focus on will change every time you do this.

Once you’ve found your character, you have two main options on how to write. You can try to put yourself in their shoes, making their story as realistic as possible for this person.  Or you can just write, using the real person as a starting point but not worrying where their story takes you.  Now write. Write their background, their life, why they’re in the coffee shop, anything that helps explain who they are.  Spend at least 15 minutes continuously writing, with no pauses.  Don’t stop short though, if 15 minutes isn’t enough just keep going.

Once you’re done, relax and give your character a name.  Then put your pages away and don’t look at them for at least a day.  This will give you some separation before you do any revising.

If any of you should happen to do this, let me know how it goes.  I’ve always been a huge fan of people watching and really enjoy taking it this extra step.

The Rabbit Hole

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