Emily Dickinson

This tag is associated with 2 posts

Lessons Found in Unlikely Places – Emily Dickinson 1350

Emily dickinson

Image via Wikipedia

Tired after a long day’s work, I sought a quick distraction before shutting down.  Emily Dickinson came to the rescue.  Here is her short, yet powerful untitled poem 1350

Luck is not chance —
It’s Toil —
Fortune’s expensive smile
Is earned —
The Father of the Mine
Is that old-fashioned Coin
We spurned —

I find it extremely interesting that someone who lived in such extreme isolation can speak so perfectly of  hard work and ambition.  Thank you Emily.  I will make my own fortune, my own luck.

As I Look Forward to Spring – Emily Dickinson’s Poem 812

Emily Dickinson

Image via Wikipedia

Readers,

If any of you have had an injury that kept you relatively immobile and generally stuck indoors, you’ll easily understand the following.  I’m two and a half weeks into what will likely be a six-week hiatus from normal life.  Not that it’s all been bad, but there’s definitely a pressure building, a need to escape… back to the real world beyond this house.

For today’s post, I’ve included a poem by Emily Dickinson which speaks of the scientifically unexplainable contentment that comes with Spring.  As the days grow longer and the daily temperatures rise, I’m struck by how creatively perfect this poem is.  One of the most pleasant aspects of my job is my morning drive in the Spring.  The wisps of fog rising across the open fields, a hint of daybreak shining across the horizon, it all provides for a flawless morning of reflection and gratitude for the gifts in my life.

Also, notice that she capitalizes the word ‘Light’ in the first line, giving it an almost god-like quality.  In doing so, she helps to increase the reverence justifiably felt for this most natural occurrence.

I truly can’t wait for Spring…

               812

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period —
When March is scarcely here

A Color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.

It waits upon the Lawn,
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.

Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay —

A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.

               ~ Emily Dickinson

I hope you enjoyed this as much as I did and I look forward to your comments.

The Hatter

The Rabbit Hole

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